Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Week of 10 December 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


 #AllAboard 


English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?
                            How did The Enlightenment/The Age of Reason affect progress and change?
                            Was the Declaration of Independence written for selfish or ideological reasons?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence (Historian Interpretations due 12/10, Review of the Grievances on 12/11, Test is on 12/11) and Preamble to the Constitution (Iroquois Constitution Article due on 12/12.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates the historical documents, speech, biography, and The Crucible with examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will be writing the Short News Package and creating videos for the live broadcast.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?
                               How do rhetoric skills improve speech writing and presentation?

Students will identify and create statements on Fact, Value, and Policy. They will use reasoning and logic to analyze statements as false.  The work and discussion will aid in the creation of their thesis for the Persuasive Speech.  Students will need to use 6-8 sources for their Persuasive Speech. They will be responsible for the smooth integration of a Google Slideshow into their speech.  Students will be required to upload their Slideshow to Google Classroom.  They will hand in hard copies of the following items:  Persuasive Speech Worksheet, outline, podium cards, and a final copy with a works cited page.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?


This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create and present projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

Week of 4 December 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 



 #AllAboard 


English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?
                            How did The Enlightenment/The Age of Reason affect progress and change?
                            Was the Declaration of Independence written for selfish or ideological reasons?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence (Olwell Argument due date is 11/27.  The Enlightenment Article due 11/30.  Declaration Interpretations due 12/5.  Test is on 12/10) and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates the historical documents, speech, biography, and The Crucible with examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will present their speeches. They will be responsible for the smooth integration of a Google Slideshow into their speech.  Students will be required to upload their Slideshow to Google Classroom.  They will hand in hard copies of the following items:  Annotated Bibliography, outline, podium cards, and a final copy.  MLK Critique is due on Tuesday, December 4th.  Chapter 16 is due on Tuesday, December 4th.  Chapter 17 is due on Thursday, December 6th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?


This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create and present projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Week of 26 November 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


 #AllAboard 


No School on Monday, 26 November 2018

English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?
                            How did The Enlightenment/The Age of Reason affect change?
                            Was the Declaration of Independence written for selfish or ideological reasons?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence (Olwell Argument due date is 11/19.  The Enlightenment Article due 11/27.  Declaration Interpretations due 11/28.  Test is on 11/30) and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates The Crucible to examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will continue to prepare and practice their speeches.  They will need to use 4-6 sources in their Informative Speech.  They will need to create an Annotated Bibliography for each source researched.  Speech Outlines are due by November 13th.  Hard copies of their Annotated Bibliographies will be due no later than November 13th.  Students will be required to include a PowerPoint/Google Slides.  They will need to print out note cards.  Final copies of the speeches are due no later than Tuesday, November 27th.  Speeches will commence on November 27th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?


This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create and present projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Monday, November 19, 2018

Week of 19 November 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


 #AllAboard 


English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence (due date is now 11/19) and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates The Crucible to examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will continue to prepare and practice their speeches.  They will need to use 4-6 sources in their Informative Speech.  They will need to create an Annotated Bibliography for each source researched.  Speech Outlines are due by November 13th.  Hard copies of their Annotated Bibliographies will be due no later than November 13th.  Students will be required to include a PowerPoint/Google Slides.  They will need to print out note cards.  Final copies of the speeches are due no later than Tuesday, November 27th.  Speeches will commence on November 27th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?



This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create and present projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Week of 12 November 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 


 #AllAboard 



English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates The Crucible to examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will continue to prepare and practice their speeches.  They will need to use 4-6 sources in their Informative Speech.  They will need to create an Annotated Bibliography for each source researched.  Speech Outlines are due by November 9th.  Hard copies of their Annotated Bibliographies will be due no later than November 9th.  Students will be required to include a PowerPoint/Google Slides.  They will need to print out note cards.  Final copies of the speeches are due no later than Tuesday, November 13th.  Speeches will commence on November 13th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?



This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Monday, November 5, 2018

Week of 5 November 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 



 #AllAboard 



English 11:   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates The Crucible to examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will continue to prepare and practice their speeches.  They will need to use 4-6 sources in their Informative Speech.  They will need to create an Annotated Bibliography for each source researched.  Speech Outlines are due by November 9th.  Hard copies of their Annotated Bibliographies will be due no later than November 9th.  Students will be required to include a PowerPoint/Google Slides.  They will need to print out note cards.  Final copies of the speeches are due no later than Tuesday, November 13th.  Speeches will commence on November 13th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?

This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Week of 29 October 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for meaning and relevancy of the work as a whole. Literature is also an example of good writing. The writing improves when a student reads. Vocabulary also improves because the student is learning to read in context. We want successful students who can think critically and communicate effectively. 



 #AllAboard 



English 11:   How does the past continue to affect my present?
                      How do I recognize and analyze Gothic Literature?
     
 FINAL Due Date for the Compare/Contrast slideshow is October 31st

                11/1   How do individuals stand up and take responsibility for changing their societies?

Students will explore the history and effects of social responsibility through informational texts, historical documents, speeches, and drama.  Over the next marking period, students will analyze and discuss the need for change.  They will identify, research, and analyze a variety of fiction and nonfiction works that deal with relevant themes of individuality and cooperation, dignity, heroes, hope, fear, power and protest. They will read and analyze the Declaration of Independence and Preamble to the Constitution.  Students will read and discuss Henry David Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” and Patrick Henry’s speech to the Second Virginia Convention. For connection and relevancy, they will be required to create a website that thematically relates The Crucible to examples from the past and the present. Students will be asked to take a stand and decide whether or not protest is effective.  

Broadcast Journalism:  How does what we know about the world shape our perspectives?
                                        How do I get ready for a LIVE broadcast?

Students will continue working as a team to get ready for daily live broadcasts.  Students will prepare scripts and equipment, collaborate, and create.  They will work on making sure that the Newscast progresses and improves.  Students are creating Public Service Announcements (PSA) for various upcoming events.  They are learning and using technology to create and produce logos, taglines, promos, sounds, and video for group monthly video segments.  Students will promote daily district events on Facebook.


Public Speaking:  How do basic speaking and listening skills help us to communicate?
                              Why are clear, concise, specific organized ideas necessary speech skills ?

Students will continue to prepare and practice their speeches.  They will need to use 4-6 sources in their Informative Speech.  They will need to create an Annotated Bibliography for each source researched.  Annotated Bibliographies will be due no later than November 2.  Students will be required to include a PowerPoint.  They will need to print out note cards.  Speeches will commence on November 5th.

Keystone Remediation:   How does my interaction with the text provoke thinking and response?
                                         What are my strengths and weaknesses?

This course requires a student to show improvement in standards that need to be strengthened.  Students will be given a set of activities to complete each week.  They will be responsible for meeting, grading, and conferencing with the teacher on areas of strengths and weaknesses.  Every student will focus and work on improving their reading and writing skills for success on the Keystone.  Students will be asked to create projects that will not only challenge themselves, but also their peers.  They will be asked to produce relevant work that will help all of us to rise to the challenge of critical thinking.  Highlighting, annotating, vocabulary dissection, vocabulary in context, fictional and nonfictional analysis, identification and application of literary terms, sample tests, and written responses will be practiced on a regular basis.

Week of 10 December 2018

The goal of this English class is to produce critical thinkers and problem solvers. Students are not only reading for comprehension but for...